This Week in Tech 639: Anywhere but Albany

The iPhone X is the best phone a huge pile of money can buy. Jeff Bezos, the richest man in the world, cashes out $1 billion in Amazon stock. Congress has some words with Facebook, Twitter, and Google. Can Facebook be fixed? Can Twitter? Animoji, poop emoji, and burger emoji continue to be news.

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This Week in Tech 638: The Frightful 5 on the Splinternet

Ordering the iPhone X. The Essential phone and its lack of press coverage. Who owns your face, malicious face recogntion and the lack of face case law. The splintered internet explained. The iPhone calulator flaw. Burn-in problems reproted for the Pixel 2. AI dominating companies and the Frightful 5 identififed. Amazon, Alphabet and Microsoft earnings beat expectations. The consequence of monopolies. The General Data Protection Regulation and its implication for your personal data. Amazon delivering inside your house now. Roger Stone has been banned from Twitter. Facebook might start charging publishers to promote their stories in the main news feed and of course the controversary surrounding the cheeseburger emoji.

This Week in Tech 636: A Fat Suit for Your Phone

The New York Times clamps down on social media. Twitter will clamp down on hate. Qualcomm drags China into its fight with Apple. Google drags Target into its fight with Amazon. TransUnion drags itself into everyone’s fight with Equifax. Oculus announces a wire-free VR headset. Shell buys into electric charging. Atari 2600 turns 40. US vs Japan giant robot fight go!

This Week in Tech 633: Future Proof This Kid

Uber’s new CEO says that there is a “high cost to a bad reputation” after London kicks it to the curb. Apple’s iPhone 8 comes out to less fanfare than usual; Apple Watch has LTE issues. ARKit’s first wave of apps is out, and Robert Scoble is severely underwhelmed. Google aqui-hires HTC’s Pixel team for over a billion dollars. Equifax: what now? CCleaner malware: who was it targeting? Facebook, Google, and Twitter allow ad targeting for racist terms – has the algorithm gone amok? What is the best thing for a nine-year-old to start learning now to keep from being one of the billion people who lose their jobs in the coming decades?

This Week in Tech 627: Do You Inkwell?

Leo, Ashley Esqueda, Michael Nunez, and Dylan Tweney debunk the “Google Memo.” Mark Zuckerberg still refuses to admit he is running for president. If you use Instagram’s “Inkwell” filter, you are probably depressed. Google is taking over the open internet. An MIT Algorithm can tell if you are sarcastic on Twitter. HBO hack fallout. Phishing the White House. Podcast patent troll loses to EFF. Email Patent Troll vs Techdirt. Snap stock down after Facebook/Instagram copies all their best features. Forget everything you know about passwords. Hacking computers with DNA.

–Ashley Esqueda knows about the secret island where we are raising Leo Laporte clones.
–Dylan Tweney would prefer that you not use a Valley Girl accent when talking about his company.
–Michael Nunez is feeling kind of sweaty right now.

This Week in Tech 625: Walking to the Bodega

Apple pays $506 million and €1.7 billion for patent infringements. Trump says that Apple will build 3 big plants in the US; Apple declines to comment. Apple kills the iPod Nano and Shuffle. Coders aren’t happy about the new spaceship campus. Amazon, Alphabet, and Twitter stocks slide after earning reports, but Facebook is flying high. Your Roomba is NOT spying on you. Sweden leaks private info of all its citizens. Hackers crack safes, pwn voting machines, and inject code into mice at DEF CON. Flash is finally dying – in 2020. Everything you ever wanted to know about the upcoming Bitcoin split but were afraid to ask.

–Alex “Will” Wilhelm sleeps in Leo’s parents’ bedroom.
–Mike Murphy was NOT bought by Steve Job’s widow this week.
–Steve Kovach can see the Empire State Building right now.

This Week in Tech 619: Honey, I Shrunk the Panel

Amazon buys Whole Foods, and has its eyes on Slack. Apple’s HomePod – Sonos killer? Facebook’s Safety Check causes stress. Twitter’s redesign. Voter fraud conspiracies. E3 announcements.

–Jason’s Pick: Zero Fasting Tracker
–Brian’s Pick: React Native
–Peter’s Pick: Star Trek Bridge Crew
–Dave’s Pick: Boosted Board, EZ Robot

This Week in Tech 608: Supercanoe

US Congress votes to kill ISP privacy rules. Fixing fake news is harder than anyone imagined. Apple AR might not be good for gamers. Twitter changes default profile picture. The best 2017 April Fools jokes.

–Brianna Wu wants to fix the government from within.
–Erin Griffith’s husband learned to solve a Rubik’s Cube during this show.
–Larry Magid remembers when facts mattered in news.

Google, Microsoft, Salesforce and Verizon are all reportedly interested in buying Twitter

By Shawn Knight | TechSpot

Twitter last October brought back former CEO Jack Dorsey to once again helm the company he helped create. More importantly, they needed him to help steer the ship back on course following multiple miscues.

Twitter has been taking on water for a while but you’d never know it at first glance. The social network is seemingly preferred by every major celebrity and Internet influencer and hashtags have invaded our daily lives. You can’t even watch the evening news without hearing about what ordinary people think about a given story courtesy of Twitter.

Dig a bit deeper, however, and you’ll find a myriad of problems plaguing the microblogging platform.

The company has failed to curb the rampant bullying and abuse that takes place each and every day on its platform. User growth has remained flat for several quarters. Revenue is tough to come by as larger companies are getting the lion’s share of advertising dollars.

It’s no surprise, then, that Twitter may soon find itself under new ownership.

CNBC on Friday said that Google and Salesforce are both interested in making an offer for Twitter. What’s more, TechCrunch notes that Microsoft and Verizon are also interested although the latter may have too much on its plate right now given its recent acquisition of Yahoo (and AOL before that) as well as its interest in Vessel.

Share value in Twitter is up more than 20 percent on the buyout chatter.

In the meantime, Twitter is attempting to reinvigorate itself as a video streaming platform as evident by recent deals with organizations such as the NFL.