The New Screen Savers 122: Building a Bug-Out-Bag for the Zombie Apocalypse

On this week’s episode of The New Screen Savers for Saturday, September 16, 2017:

– Fr. Father Robert, SJ and Patrick Norton discuss Apple’s new iPhone X and iPhone 8, more Equifax breach fallout, and racist ad-targeting options offered by Twitter, Facebook, and Google.

– Scotty Allen of Strange Parts joins us to show how he was able to install a 3.5mm headphone jack into an iPhone 7 by taking apart Apple’s Lightning adapter and building it into a custom circuit board.

– When it comes to disasters like earthquakes, hurricanes, and zombies, everyone needs a bug-out-bag. Patrick and Fr. Robert battle it out to see what’s in their go-bag and talk about what you should do to be prepared.

– Speaking of improvising, Jason Howell has a trick for powering your smartphone with a 9-volt battery.

– Megan Morrone has part five of her Digital Cleanse series. This week she shows you what you can do to cleaning up your hard drive.

– Patrick and Robert answer a Call for Help about Digital Audio Converters (DACs). Do you need them to get the most out of your lossless audio music?

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The New Screen Savers 121: Essential Phone Review and Teardown

Leo Laporte and Jason Howell take an in-depth look at the new Essential Phone PH-1. It finally arrived and Jason has spent a lot of time with it the last few days and will have a review. Also, Kelsea Weber from iFixit.com joins us to talk about what’s inside the Essential Phone. They had a hard time getting inside and had to freeze it! (plus they broke two screens!) Leo has the new Mavic Pro drone from DJI. We’ll take it for a spin and see if it’s worth the high price tag. Megan Morrone has a full review of the Tovala smart oven. Father Robert Ballecer, SJ has some ideas to bring new life to your old remote controls. In Call For Help, we’ll talk about whether or not you should install Oreo on your Android phone.

– Equifax gets hacked and leaked personal info of 143 million consumers.
– Will the new Apple iPhone be named iPhone X?

This Week in Tech 629: When in Doubt, Hit the Raccoon

Will Meg Whitman Be Uber’s next CEO? Germany decides when it is okay for self-driving cars to kill people, and which people they should kill. Android Oreo is official. Samsung releases the Galaxy Note 8. Apple might announce its new iPhones on September 12th. Google may announce the new Pixels on October 5th. Nobody really knows when the Essential will arrive. Google teams up with Walmart as Amazon’s purchase of Whole Foods goes through and Kale goes on sale. Facebook and Focus feature stream studio movies; Netflix and dispensaries develop new strains of weed. Australian beaches are now safer thanks to shark-detecting drones.

This Week in Tech 626: CEO Barbie

WannaCry hero pinched by the feds: should infosec professionals avoid the US?. Google’s internal anti-diversity viral memo: women can’t code? Vic Gundotra: iPhone photos beat Android and DSLR? Did Facebook narrowly avoid creating SkyNet? Who in their right mind would want to be Uber’s CEO? Is your drone spying on you?

–Amy Webb’s Journalism professor told her that nobody would ever publish camera phone photos
–Rob Reid got his start writing humorous Amazon reviews
–Iain Thompson’s phrase of the week: “They over-egged the pudding on that one.”

This Week in Tech 623: Binders Full of CEOs

Disney will build a Star Wars-themed hotel where each guest gets a story. Uber says they are getting lots of applications for their open CEO post, but nobody big seems interested. Apple iPhone 8 rumors abound. Google is trying to eliminate Zika by releasing 20 million bacteria-infected mosquitos in Fresno, CA. Amazon is creating a new messaging app called Anytime. Prime Day was Amazon’s biggest sales day ever, and Best Buy stock dropped $1 billion over the rumor that Amazon is developing a Geek Squad competitor. If you don’t want Homeland Security to scan your face, you shouldn’t travel. Windows Phone 8.1 is dead. US welcomes Afghan girls robotics team, and the “world’s first robot lawyer” – meanwhile, Elon Musk warns that we need AI regulation sooner rather than later.

• Devindra Hardawar is still mad that new iPhones have no headphone jack.
• Georgia Dow needs a house with two VR rooms.
• Jill Duffy is learning Romanian on Duolingo.

This Week in Tech 621: Butler in a Box

New York Times reporter Katie Benner joins us to talk about sexual harassment in Silicon Valley. Former host of MacBreak Weekly Scott Bourne joins us to talk about what it was like getting the 1st iPhone 10 years ago. This Week in Law host Denise Howell talks about the EU’s €2.42 billion judgement against Google, and Zillow’s suit against McMansion Hell. Iain Thompson rounds out the panel with some luddite views of the Amazon Echo Show and harsh words for The Guardian.

This Week in Tech 620: From Key West to Key Largo

Amazon buys Whole Foods, might buy Slack. Travis Kalanick resigns as Uber CEO. The best drones money can buy. iPad Pro is the future of Mac laptops. Neighbor spoofing robocaller made a million calls a day. Apple Music now $99/year. Why Apple made the iPhone.

–Owen JJ Stone has strange ideas about geography.
–Tom Merritt writes books about time travel.
–Jason Hiner writes books about amazing podcasters.

Microsoft writes the final chapter in the book of Zune

By | TechSpot

Microsoft over the weekend wrote the final chapter in the book of Zune, making good on its promise to retire a streaming music subscription service long past its prime.

The move means that owners of Microsoft’s failed media player are no longer able to streaming or download content from the Zune music service. As such, the device has effectively been downgraded to a standard MP3 player although Microsoft says that media purchased with DRM may not play if its license can’t be renewed.

Those with existing Zune Music Pass subscriptions will be automatically converted to Groove Music Pass subscriptions.

This past summer, Microsoft ditched its Xbox Music branding in favor of Groove, a name that resident Microsoft blogger Brandon LeBlanc said described what people feel and do with music. Microsoft’s Joe Belfiore said the change was made to eliminate confusion as some believed the service was an Xbox exclusive.

Microsoft introduced the Zune in late 2006 as an obvious (yet late) answer to the iPod. Apple, meanwhile, was busy working on the original iPhone that Steve Jobs would unveil just a few months later in early 2007. Jobs famously billed the iPhone as an iPod, a phone and an Internet communicator.

It wasn’t long until the concept of a standalone MP3 player became obsolete, its functions instead rolled into modern smartphones. Had Microsoft launched the Zune a few years earlier, it would have almost certainly found more success.