Security Now 669: Cellular Location Privacy

SCOTUS Cell Phone Location Privacy This week we examine some new side-channel worries and vulnerabilities, did Mandiant “hack back” on China?, more trouble with browsers, the big Google Firebase mess, sharing a bit of my dead system resurrection, and a look at the recent Supreme Court decision addressing cellular location privacy.

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Smart Home Security Tips

Megan Morrone and Florence Ion talk to Stacey Higginbotham about tips for securing your smart home. The advantages and disadvantages of running devices on a guest network. Plus, how do you know if your devices are getting regular firmware updates.

This Week in Tech 673: The Prozac Dash Button

Reinventing Microsoft, Amazon’s push into healthcare, new Apple Maps, and more.

–Apple vs Samsung settled: our long international nightmare is over.
–A proposed US law has patent trolls jumping for joy.
–Amazon jumps into the healthcare business by buying online pharmacy PillPack.
–Foxcon’s new Wisconsin plant breaks ground.
–Yet another Facebook security breach, but this time a bug bounty program catches the leak.
–Twitter’s new Ad Transparency Center opens new avenues for journalists.
–The sky is falling in Fortnite.
–WPA3 could make Wi-Fi a lot more secure.
–California follows Europe down the data privacy road.
–Christina Warren knows all the Andromeda secrets, but she’s not talking.
–AOL Instant Messenger is reborn! –StumbleUpon is not. 😦

This Week in Tech 672: Meme the Queen

Two HUGE Supreme Court decisions, Apple admits its keyboards suck, Europe’s war on memes, and more.

— The US Supreme Court kills warrantless cell phone location fishing and okays state sales taxes on internet purchases.
— Apple offers refunds on MacBook butterfly keyboard repairs and wants to let you use your iPhone to unlock your car.
— Amazon wants to put Alexa in your hotel room, and everywhere else.
— Professional videogames are going mainstream, with huge stadiums and $100 million prizes.
— A proposed European Union copyright law will declare war on memes.
— IGTV is Instagram’s attempt to jump on the online video bandwagon.
— Plus: transhumanism, Domino’s as an infrastructure company, and IBM’s new debate robot!

This Week in Tech 668: How Many Cups in a Stone?

–The FBI wants you to reboot your router right now. FBI agents have gained control of a huge Russian botnet. If your router is affected you just need to reboot it.
–Facebook and Russian ads – how should government react in the age of cyber warfare?
–Amazon sells facial recognition software to law enforcement officials. Is this an invasion of privacy, or a good example of public/private cooperation?
–Alexa records a couple’s conversation and sends it to a friend. Amazon has a convoluted explanation, but it may just come down to odds.
–Google’s AI can order you food, but Microsoft’s can check in on your feelings, at least in China.
–GDPR confusion takes news sites offline and sparks billions of dollars worth of lawsuits.
–Disney’s bid to buy Fox gets some competition from Comcast. Does this mean that Hulu is doomed?
–Senators call for investigation into fake pro-net neutrality comments
–Three charged in swatting death

Security Now 657: ProtonMail

This week we discuss “DrupalGeddon2”, Cloudflare’s new DNS offering, a reminder about GRC’s DNS Benchmark, Microsoft’s Meltdown meltdown, the persistent iOS QR Code flaw and its long-awaited v11.3 update, another VPN user IP leak, more bug bounty news, an ill-fated-seeming new eMail initiative, Free electricity, a policy change at Google’s Chrome store, another “please change your passwords” after another website breach, a bit of miscellany, a heart-warming SpinRite report, some closing the loop feedback from our terrific listeners, and a closer look at the Swiss encrypted ProtonMail service.

Updates for Spectre and Meltdown

Jason Howell and Megan Morrone talk to Ed Bott from the Ed Bott Report on ZDNet about what every Windows Admin needs to know about Spectre and Meltdown and four steps to keeping a level head during this vulnerability and the next. Plus, what might have happened if the update had been able to come out on Microsoft’s Patch Tuesday as planned, instead of being rushed because of the embargo breach.

This Week in Tech 648: Distracted by the Robots

The best explanation for the Meltdown and Spectre computer flaws comes from a comic strip. Apple eats crow over slowing iPhones. Magic Leap might not be vaporware after all – will this lead to the death of smartphones? CES 2018 predictions. Prediction #1: no Ajit Pai. SWATting death: who is to blame? Border agents phone searches are way up just as new rules limiting searches are drafted. Please stop giving this man money: Juicero founder now hawking bacteria-filled “raw water.”