This Week in Tech 668: How Many Cups in a Stone?

–The FBI wants you to reboot your router right now. FBI agents have gained control of a huge Russian botnet. If your router is affected you just need to reboot it.
–Facebook and Russian ads – how should government react in the age of cyber warfare?
–Amazon sells facial recognition software to law enforcement officials. Is this an invasion of privacy, or a good example of public/private cooperation?
–Alexa records a couple’s conversation and sends it to a friend. Amazon has a convoluted explanation, but it may just come down to odds.
–Google’s AI can order you food, but Microsoft’s can check in on your feelings, at least in China.
–GDPR confusion takes news sites offline and sparks billions of dollars worth of lawsuits.
–Disney’s bid to buy Fox gets some competition from Comcast. Does this mean that Hulu is doomed?
–Senators call for investigation into fake pro-net neutrality comments
–Three charged in swatting death

Advertisements

Security Now 657: ProtonMail

This week we discuss “DrupalGeddon2”, Cloudflare’s new DNS offering, a reminder about GRC’s DNS Benchmark, Microsoft’s Meltdown meltdown, the persistent iOS QR Code flaw and its long-awaited v11.3 update, another VPN user IP leak, more bug bounty news, an ill-fated-seeming new eMail initiative, Free electricity, a policy change at Google’s Chrome store, another “please change your passwords” after another website breach, a bit of miscellany, a heart-warming SpinRite report, some closing the loop feedback from our terrific listeners, and a closer look at the Swiss encrypted ProtonMail service.

Updates for Spectre and Meltdown

Jason Howell and Megan Morrone talk to Ed Bott from the Ed Bott Report on ZDNet about what every Windows Admin needs to know about Spectre and Meltdown and four steps to keeping a level head during this vulnerability and the next. Plus, what might have happened if the update had been able to come out on Microsoft’s Patch Tuesday as planned, instead of being rushed because of the embargo breach.

This Week in Tech 648: Distracted by the Robots

The best explanation for the Meltdown and Spectre computer flaws comes from a comic strip. Apple eats crow over slowing iPhones. Magic Leap might not be vaporware after all – will this lead to the death of smartphones? CES 2018 predictions. Prediction #1: no Ajit Pai. SWATting death: who is to blame? Border agents phone searches are way up just as new rules limiting searches are drafted. Please stop giving this man money: Juicero founder now hawking bacteria-filled “raw water.”

This Week in Tech 646: 2017 Year in Review

Mark Zuckerberg tours the country – but he isn’t running for president. Amazon puts Alexa everywhere. Silicon Valley’s toxic bro culture. Twitter gets political. YouTube Kids gets algorithmically weird. CIA and NSA zero days revealed. Apple Park opens for business. Google’s bad hardware year. Bitcoin madness. Uber’s many many many many problems. Apple releases iPhone X, iMac Pro. Amazon buys Whole foods. Equifax hack.

This Week in Tech 635: Benji’s Bag of Dongles

The guy who created the like button now says it’s dangerously addictive. Facebook Chief Security Officer Alex Stamos says press doesn’t understand how hard it is to prevent voter manipulation. Yahoo admits that hack perpetrated under Yahoo Chief Security Officer Alex Stamos impacted all 3 billion Yahoo users. Google heats up the home voice assistant war, but can it catch up with Alexa? And does Apple even have a chance as Siri turns 6? Google puts another stake in the headphone jack. Equifax gets a $7.5 million contract with the IRS. Kaspersky antivirus, the NSA, and the Russian government. Slashdot turns 20. AOL Instant Messenger is finally dead.

Fix for WannaCry

Megan Morrone talks to Iain Thomson about a possible fix for those infected with the Wannacry ransomware. Researchers have found a fix to unlock affected computers. The tool called wannakiwi allows you to avoid paying the bitcoin ransom, but only if you’re running Windows XP, Windows 7, and Windows 2003 AND if you haven’t rebooted your PC since the attack. The key is not magic, its math that works by finding all the prime numbers that are stored in the ransomware’s code. A different tool called WannaKey was released yesterday but only worked on Windows XP and required a second app.